Disrupting Diversity in Tech Summit

The Disrupting Diversity in Tech Summit will examine, discuss and bring to light the disparity gaps amongst groups from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. Increasingly, Tech companies are under fire for not looking beyond gender, race and sexual orientation. CEOs and hiring managers are being openly challenged to build organizations reflecting the inclusive society in which they operate. At this Summit, leaders in Tech will share and discuss the strides being made today, the work that lies ahead tomorrow, and the rewards for those companies that already faced the challenge of diversity head on.

September 28, 2015

Time Session
1:30 PM
-
2:30 PM
Silicon Valley Women in Technology ddt

Let’s face it. You have used Houzz to get remodeling ideas about your home. You have Tweeted breaking news, checked financial data on Yahoo, used a HP product, Kicked your boyfriend’s butt at Assassin’s Creed? Then you need to thank a woman. These juggernauts were built and are operated by some serious smart women. But what’s it like to be a woman inside the tech revolution in Silicon Valley? Unfortunately, too few of us know. Women make up only 26 percent of the computing workforce, and only 18 percent of undergraduate computer science degree recipients today are women—a number that’s dropped from a high of 37 percent in 1985. This staggering imbalance has perpetuated a “brogrammer” culture. There are not enough women on boards, not enough women in high positions, not enough women in schools, not enough women investors in venture capital and not enough women being invested into. In this Silicon Valley ecosystem, not many people are proactively doing something about it. We are busy solving the problems of the world without solving a basic humanity problem of giving an equal opportunity to women.

But here’s the good news: a growing number of women in tech aren’t giving up—they’re speaking out and making changes. Meet some such women of Silicon Valley and hear them speak about how they are making things happen in a panel programmed by Germaniun Ventures.

Moderator:
Rachael Myrow, Silicon Valley Reporter, KQED

Speakers:
Sukrutha Bhadouria, Sr Software Engineer, Salesforce
Oded Hermoni, Venture Partner, Rhodium
Meera Kaul , Managing Partner, Germanium Ventures
Holly Liu, Chief Development Officer & Co-Founder, Kabam
Telle Whitney, CEO, Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology

2:30 PM
-
3:30 PM
Why Tech Needs Moms – An Economic Force That Drives Innovation ddt

The world needs more mothers developing products and services in the mobile space. American women drive 85% of consumer and business purchasing decisions totaling $7 trillion annually. And since 81% of these women become mothers, moms alone alone represent a $2.4 trillion market. There’s obviously tremendous opportunity to drive economic growth through innovations targeted at women in general and moms specifically. Yet women represent only 29.1% of the workforce at technology companies and hold merely 15.6% of technical positions, with many leaving the industry, if not the workforce altogether, before they reach leadership ranks, where representation is stalled at 22.5%. In this panel, we’ve gathered a group of women leaders in tech — all of them mothers — to discuss how increasing the representation of women in leadership and product development teams can help companies grow new markets and create competitive advantage in a globalized world.

Moderator:
Tina Lee, Founder & CEO, MotherCoders

Speakers:
Anica John, Founder, Muse Design Lab
Carly Lutz, SVP of Family Experience, Shuddle
Kathryn Rotondo, Host, Motherboard Podcast
Ayori Selassie, Sr Solution Engineer, Salesforce

3:30 PM
-
4:00 PM
Fireside Chat with Chen Levanon ddt

Chen Levanon is the CEO of ClicksMob, a leading mobile performance platform that allows publishers and advertisers to buy and sell traffic. The two-year-old company was named one of ‘America’s Most Promising Companies’ by Forbes Magazine and has grown to over $10 million in revenue while never taking venture capital funding. During our chat with the Israeli-born CEO, we will discuss how they’ve managed to successfully bootstrap a multi-million dollar company in the competitive mobile advertising industry and her vision for the future. Chen has made her way from investment banking to the C-suite in one of the leading mobile advertising startups and learned many lessons along the way. We’ll also explore her role as a woman in tech and how she has created a diverse staff that has more than 70% women employees.

Moderator:
Monique Woodard, Founder & Executive Director, Black Founders

Speaker:
Chen Levanon, CEO, ClicksMob

September 29, 2015

Time Session
2:15 PM
-
2:45 PM
Why We Founded recruitHER: Driving Diversity Recruiting & Retention in Technology ddt, edge

At present, only 26% of programmers in the U.S. are women, and just 1 in 14 tech employees in Silicon Valley is black or Latino. The research definitively proves the value of a diverse workforce, and yet tech companies continue to struggle to move the needle on diversity. Many companies who want to do the right thing and leverage the business benefits of diversity unwittingly employ strategies for recruiting that fail to generate interest from women and minority candidates. A pervasive preoccupation with the “STEM pipeline” can also sidetrack companies from achieving increased diversity in the business and creative areas where there’s no shortage of diverse talent. In this presentation, Gina Helfrich, co-founder of recruitHER, will share the research that explains why diversity recruiting and retention can be so difficult. She will also discuss best practices for creating a workplace and a brand identity that attracts and keeps diverse talent, and how recruitHER is helping tech companies make tangible progress on their diversity goals.

Speaker:
Gina Helfrich, Co-founder, recruitHER

September 30, 2015

Time Session
1:30 PM
-
2:15 PM
There’s Gold in Those Streets: A Case for Diversifying the Tech Workforce ddt, edge

Whether it be market share, creativity, or a moral North Star, when we fail to build inclusive and diverse companies, there is much we stand to lose. Workforces limited in their composition are equally limited in their reach. While countless technology firms make claims about “solving the world’s problems,” too frequently they lack teams with sufficiently variable backgrounds and experiences to build solutions that speak to a broad user base. The Bay Area technology scene is often described in terms of the flurry of activity taking place in San Francisco and Silicon Valley, all the while the region is host to any number of racially and culturally diverse communities known for their production of cultural, intellectual, and business capital. Companies’ failure to recognize and capitalize on the human resources growing out of these communities unknowingly incur marked opportunity costs. Worse, tech firms frequently possess inadequate data to benchmark their internal diversity, all the while competing in a sector in which data is paramount.

In this session, The Hidden Genius Project will share lessons learned from training high school-aged black male youth in software development, entrepreneurship, and leadership skills, in addition to taking them to visit local tech firms. These young men (and so many like them) are proof positive of that underrepresented communities of color within cities like Oakland (which is comprised of 65% people of color). Our intensive programming has taken us to a multitude of tech companies, including nine this past summer. The aforementioned lessons shed light on how firms might consider prioritizing a more inclusive workforce, improving their organizational culture, and enhancing their use of quality data to attract and retain a more robust workforce of color, and subsequently expand their business opportunities.

Speakers:
Brandon Nicholson, Ph.D.; Executive Director, The Hidden Genius Project
Akeem O. Brown; Programs Director, The Hidden Genius Project

2:45 PM
-
3:30 PM
Mobile Differentiation Using Diversity & Data bigdata, ddt, edge

An intro will be provided by the leader of Women in Wireless discussing the importance of diversity and networking, and then we’ll discuss how mobile data can be used across different demographics. Women led households have tremendous commercial influence, and marketers are looking closely at mobile data to find the best way to reach them. We’ll look at various ways that mobile marketers use data to personalize diverse messages. This panel programmed by Women in Wireless will also show how you can bring diversity to your programs and your work place.

Moderator:
Aurelie Guerrieri, Co-President, Women in Wireless

Speakers:
Ann Kennedy, VP Product Management, Acxiom
Dre Madden, Director of Global Marketing, Display & Mobile, OpenTable
Farzana Nasser, Co-Founder, Gallop & Co-Chair, Panels & Partnerships, Women in Wireless